cleaning solution ingredients

Homemade and Inexpensive (Healthy) Household Cleaner for Any Surface–It Takes a Minute to Make!

If you are tired of spending money on expensive and unhealthy household cleaners, there’s an inexpensive, healthier alternative that takes seconds to make.  Continue reading “Homemade and Inexpensive (Healthy) Household Cleaner for Any Surface–It Takes a Minute to Make!”

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Quick and Cheap Way to Clean the Grill

Use a little elbow grease when cleaning with aluminum foil, but it works. Just don’t forget to rinse the grills after this cleaning process so you don’t get bits of foil in your food (which seems less scary than getting a brush bristle in your gut).

I have a fear of grill brushes. It sounds odd–but this phobia came from seeing an older “Medical Mystery: You be the Doctor” television show on ABC where a bristle fell off a grill brush, stuck to the grill, then became cooked into a hamburger patty, and after the burger was eaten, it finally caused chaos in one person’s gut. (For more, see this article.) So, I banned the tool from our house. Instead, I tried a number of items, a grill cleaning cream and a stone-type tool (neither worked), the Magic Eraser (my favorite product, but nope, didn’t work), and finally somewhere I saw a tip to use crumpled up foil to get the gunk off. It works! But, here’s the thing: you have to wipe down (with a damp cloth) or hose off the grills after using the foil technique or else you, too, will be featured on a “Medical Mystery” show.

For more grill cleaning tips, see this article on cleaning a gas grill.

~Marilyn, TFF

Clean Fruits & Vegetables With Inexpensive Wash You Make Yourself

veggies
Who sneezes into YOUR fruits and veggies in the grocery store? (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Years ago when I worked in New York City, I saw people constantly sneezing and coughing into salad bars at lunchtime (let’s not even mention the roaches I’d see in restaurants). I was thinner when I worked in the city because I lost my appetite on many days. Continue reading “Clean Fruits & Vegetables With Inexpensive Wash You Make Yourself”

Lots of Homemade Cleaning Solution Recipes

Because I love Dave Ramsey so much, I keep Googling him to find more and more personal financial planning success stories, and discovered this Forum with loads of homemade cleaning solution recipes.

20 Mule Team Borax
Image via Wikipedia

You don’t have to be a member to see the threads, and this particular topic under Frugal Living features dozens of fantastic natural, inexpensive homemade cleaner recipes!! I have bookmarked it for my own use. Enjoy!!

Marilyn from TFF

Easy Recipe for Homemade Liquid Soap

I love this post from Savvy Housekeeping on how to take all your dried-up bars of soap and make something useful from them–liquid soap! I will try this tomorrow once I get the ingredients. Thank you for the great tutorial!  Continue reading “Easy Recipe for Homemade Liquid Soap”

Homemade Automatic Dishwasher Detergent with Baking Soda – It Really Works!

 

English: Sodium bicarbonate, sodium hydrogenca...
Sodium bicarbonate. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We’ve been reading about the miracle uses of baking soda. So, one day, we ran out of automatic dishwashing detergent. In a pinch, we decided to make some detergent with two tablespoons baking soda mixed with two tablespoons of Borax (we have a box in our laundry room just gathering dust). You cannot believe how beautiful our dishes came out! For pennies a wash! We are now converts and will not need to buy commercial dish detergent.

The cost: Since two tablespoons = one dry ounce, you can see how far this will go. A small 16 oz. box of baking soda costs under $1.00 and will last about 32 loads. A 76 oz. box of Borax ix about $5.00 and will last 152 loads of dishes. Assume you do one load a day, you will need 12 boxes of baking soda (or buy bigger versions, we just don’t have that on hand here…) and two boxes of Borax.

Total for the year to wash dishes if you do a load a day: approximately $22.00.

Total for the year to buy commercial dish detergent: average $5 a large box, which lasts about a month (or less), costs approximately $60.00 a year. We based this on our  frugal purchases of store brand detergent and Cascade. However, we know many people who use newfangled products such as cubes, gels, and  tabs–all of which are more money and promise better results, but we bet the results are just as good as baking soda and Borax.

Again, here’s the recipe:

2 tbs. baking soda

2 tbs. Borax

Put mixture into washer’s detergent holder as you would normally with any detergent. (NOTE: Some people find that this is way too much detergent for their dishwasher’s compartment. In that case, simply mix the solution up in a bowl/container and pour as much as fits. If you prefer, just mix bigger batches and keep in a glass jar or plastic container and scoop out with an old coffee scoop.)

Our dishes have never, ever looked cleaner–no scratches, no water spots, just crystal clear glasses, dishes, and silverware. Our dishwasher is cleaner inside, too. Typically, we don’t love homemade products because they may not work better than store-bought solutions, but this is different.