The Tightwad’s Notebook–Lesson 14: Learn to Darn Socks (Seriously)

The Tightwad’s Notebook–Lesson 14: Learn to Darn Socks (Seriously)

Socks are expensive. Especially soccer and other sports socks. That’s why I decided to get serious about learning to darn a sock the semi-correct way. I’m not about to go out and spend $7 every time there’s a hole in my son’s soccer socks. I used to darn a sock by just sewing together the holes. That made it uncomfortable to wear, the sock would stretch and the hole would sometimes reopen. And, that method only works for small holes. For darning large holes, I have to thank Amy Dacyczyn for her “Quickie Darning Method” found in her original “Tightwad Gazette” book (page 150-151).

She advises finding a “sacrificial” sock–you know, the ones you ditch because you can’t find its mate. Keep a couple of these in various colors. I want to kick myself (no pun intended) because I used up a bunch of these mate-less socks as dusting rags. But as soon as your kids grow out of socks, keep them in a sacrificial pile. You won’t regret it.

Here are steps for darning a sock (hard to take some shots with one hand!)–it only takes a few minutes to do this and saves a bunch of money–why throw out an otherwise perfectly good pair of socks when you can darn them?

4 thoughts on “The Tightwad’s Notebook–Lesson 14: Learn to Darn Socks (Seriously)

  1. I still have my grandmother’s old “darning egg” (looks like a wooden egg on a stick, used to insert into the sock being darned to keep from sewing your fingers). You’ve inspired me to break it out for support sock repair.

    1. Another thought–I found some great wood in my husband’s workshop to use, perfect for this (some spindles with rounded tops, good for kid socks, that sort of thing). Got me thinking that there are alternatives to my hand, lol! ~Marilyn

    2. This is so great for children of this generation to see and learn how to do! Marilyn, I say tell your son what great thing you did for him AND the world today; you did your part to avoid being part of the throw-away society in which we live. ~Aimee

      On Wed, Sep 12, 2012 at 10:17 AM, Two Frugal Fairfielders WordPress wrote:

      > Another thought–I found some great wood in my husband’s workshop to use, > perfect for this (some spindles with rounded tops, good for kid socks, that > sort of thing). Got me thinking that there are alternatives to my hand, > lol! ~Marilyn > >

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